Posted by: pinkturtle2 | Disember 9, 2008

Sambutan Eidul Adha Di Seluruh Dunia

Muslim pilgrims circle the Kaaba at the Grand mosque in Mecca December 8, 2008. More than two million Muslim pilgrims headed to Muzdalifa on Sunday to cast stones at the devil in the most dangerous part of the haj pilgrimage.REUTERS

Muslim pilgrims circle the Kaaba at the Grand mosque in Mecca December 8, 2008. More than two million Muslim pilgrims headed to Muzdalifa on Sunday to cast stones at the devil in the most dangerous part of the haj pilgrimage.REUTERS

Muslim pilgrims pray at the Grand mosque in Mecca December 8, 2008. More than two million Muslim pilgrims headed to Muzdalifa on Sunday to cast stones at the devil in the most dangerous part of the haj pilgrimage. Pilgrims began three days of stoning and celebrated the first day of Eid al-Adha, commemorating the willingness of biblical patriarch Abraham to sacrifice his son for God. REUTERS

Muslim pilgrims pray at the Grand mosque in Mecca December 8, 2008. More than two million Muslim pilgrims headed to Muzdalifa on Sunday to cast stones at the devil in the most dangerous part of the haj pilgrimage. Pilgrims began three days of stoning and celebrated the first day of Eid al-Adha, commemorating the willingness of biblical patriarch Abraham to sacrifice his son for God. REUTERS

Muslim pilgrims pray at Namira mosque on  the plains of Arafat outside the holy city of Mecca December 7, 2008. More than two million Muslims began the haj pilgrimage on Saturday, heading to a tent camp outside Mecca to follow the route Prophet Mohammad took 14 centuries ago. REUTERS

Muslim pilgrims pray at Namira mosque on the plains of Arafat outside the holy city of Mecca December 7, 2008. More than two million Muslims began the haj pilgrimage on Saturday, heading to a tent camp outside Mecca to follow the route Prophet Mohammad took 14 centuries ago. REUTERS

A general view is seen of Muslim pilgrims outside Mecca December 7, 2008. More than two million Muslims began the haj pilgrimage on Saturday, heading to a tent camp outside the holy city of Mecca to follow the route Prophet Mohammad took 14 centuries ago. REUTERS

A general view is seen of Muslim pilgrims outside Mecca December 7, 2008. More than two million Muslims began the haj pilgrimage on Saturday, heading to a tent camp outside the holy city of Mecca to follow the route Prophet Mohammad took 14 centuries ago. REUTERS

Palestinian worshippers pray during Eid al-Adha on the compound known to Muslims as al-Haram al-Sharif, and to Jews as Temple Mount, in Jerusalem's Old city December 8, 2008. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Adha to mark the end of the haj by slaughtering sheep, goats, cows and camels to commemorate Prophet Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son Ismail on God's command.

Palestinian worshippers pray during Eid al-Adha on the compound known to Muslims as al-Haram al-Sharif, and to Jews as Temple Mount, in Jerusalem's Old city December 8, 2008. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Adha to mark the end of the haj by slaughtering sheep, goats, cows and camels to commemorate Prophet Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son Ismail on God's command.

Palestinian Muslims pray at Jerusalem's Al-Aqsa mosque compound on December 8, 2008, to pray on the first day of the Muslim feast day Eid al-Adha. Eid al-Adha, the Festival of Sacrifice, is celebrated by Muslims around the world by slaughtering camels, goats, sheeps and cattle in commemoration of the prophet Abraham's readiness to sacrifice his son to show obedience to God.

Palestinian Muslims pray at Jerusalem's Al-Aqsa mosque compound on December 8, 2008, to pray on the first day of the Muslim feast day Eid al-Adha. Eid al-Adha, the Festival of Sacrifice, is celebrated by Muslims around the world by slaughtering camels, goats, sheeps and cattle in commemoration of the prophet Abraham's readiness to sacrifice his son to show obedience to God.

An Israeli border police officer stands guard as Palestinians pray in the street after being prevented by from entering the Al Aqsa Mosque compound, also known to Jews as the Temple Mount, for Friday prayers in Jerusalem's Old City, Dec. 5, 2008. Israel placed military and police forces on alert Friday to head off new violence after the evacuation of a disputed West Bank building brought tensions between the government, extremist settlers and Palestinians to a peak.

An Israeli border police officer stands guard as Palestinians pray in the street after being prevented by from entering the Al Aqsa Mosque compound, also known to Jews as the Temple Mount, for Friday prayers in Jerusalem's Old City, Dec. 5, 2008. Israel placed military and police forces on alert Friday to head off new violence after the evacuation of a disputed West Bank building brought tensions between the government, extremist settlers and Palestinians to a peak.

Hamas leader Ismail Haniya (C) attends a special prayer organized by Hamas on the first day of Eid al-Adha in Gaza City on December 8, 2008. Eid al-Adha, the Festival of Sacrifice, is celebrated by Muslims around the world by slaughtering camels, goats, sheeps and cattle in commemoration of the prophet Abraham's readiness to sacrifice his son to show obedience to God.

Hamas leader Ismail Haniya (C) attends a special prayer organized by Hamas on the first day of Eid al-Adha in Gaza City on December 8, 2008. Eid al-Adha, the Festival of Sacrifice, is celebrated by Muslims around the world by slaughtering camels, goats, sheeps and cattle in commemoration of the prophet Abraham's readiness to sacrifice his son to show obedience to God.

Muslims attend prayer along a street to celebrate the festival of Eid al-Adha in Jakarta December 8, 2008. Indonesia, the world's most populous Muslim nation, celebrates Eid al-Adha by slaughtering goats and cows and distributing the meat to the poor.  REUTERS

Muslims attend prayer along a street to celebrate the festival of Eid al-Adha in Jakarta December 8, 2008. Indonesia, the world's most populous Muslim nation, celebrates Eid al-Adha by slaughtering goats and cows and distributing the meat to the poor. REUTERS

8, 2008. Indonesia, the world's most populous Muslim nation, celebrates Eid al-Adha by slaughtering goats and cows and distributing the meat to the poor. REUTERS

8, 2008. Indonesia, the world's most populous Muslim nation, celebrates Eid al-Adha by slaughtering goats and cows and distributing the meat to the poor. REUTERS

Members of an exclusive Muslim community who call themselves An-Nadsir attend prayer to celebrate Eid al-Adha in a remote area in Gowa district, in Indonesia's South Sulawesi province, December 8, 2008. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Adha to mark the end of the haj by slaughtering sheep, goats, cows and camels to commemorate Prophet Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son Ismail on God's command.   REUTERS

Members of an exclusive Muslim community who call themselves An-Nadsir attend prayer to celebrate Eid al-Adha in a remote area in Gowa district, in Indonesia's South Sulawesi province, December 8, 2008. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Adha to mark the end of the haj by slaughtering sheep, goats, cows and camels to commemorate Prophet Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son Ismail on God's command. REUTERS

Muslims pray along a street in Attiecoube in Abidjan December 8, 2008. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Adha by slaughtering sheep, goats, camels and cows to commemorate Prophet Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son, Ismail, on God's command.   REUTERS

Muslims pray along a street in Attiecoube in Abidjan December 8, 2008. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Adha by slaughtering sheep, goats, camels and cows to commemorate Prophet Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son, Ismail, on God's command. REUTERS

Muslims slaughter sheep on the street in Attiecoube, Abidjan December 8, 2008. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Adha by slaughtering sheep, goats, camels and cows to commemorate Prophet Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son, Ismail, on God's command.REUTERS

Muslims slaughter sheep on the street in Attiecoube, Abidjan December 8, 2008. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Adha by slaughtering sheep, goats, camels and cows to commemorate Prophet Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son, Ismail, on God's command.REUTERS

Afghan refugees living in Peshawar offer prayers to celebrate Eid al-Adha December 8, 2008. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Adha to mark the end of the haj by slaughtering sheep, goats, cows and camels to commemorate Prophet Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son Ismail on God's command.   REUTERS

Afghan refugees living in Peshawar offer prayers to celebrate Eid al-Adha December 8, 2008. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Adha to mark the end of the haj by slaughtering sheep, goats, cows and camels to commemorate Prophet Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son Ismail on God's command. REUTERS

Iraqi Shiite Muslims pray at the Imam Hussein mosque marking the start of the Eid al-Adha, in the southern city of Karbala, some 120 kms south of the capital Baghdad on December 08, 2008. Muslims across the world visit the graves of loved ones and sacrifice a sheep, goat, cow or camel on the first day of Eid al-Adha or the feast of the sacrifice which marks the end of the Muslim pilgrimage or Hajj to the holy city of Mecca in Saudi Arabia. The meat is then distributed to family members and the poor. AFP PHOTO

Iraqi Shiite Muslims pray at the Imam Hussein mosque marking the start of the Eid al-Adha, in the southern city of Karbala, some 120 kms south of the capital Baghdad on December 08, 2008. Muslims across the world visit the graves of loved ones and sacrifice a sheep, goat, cow or camel on the first day of Eid al-Adha or the feast of the sacrifice which marks the end of the Muslim pilgrimage or Hajj to the holy city of Mecca in Saudi Arabia. The meat is then distributed to family members and the poor. AFP PHOTO

Bosnian Muslims prepare a sheep for slaughter in Srebrenica on the first day of Eid al-Adha December 8, 2008. Muslim survivors of the Srebrenica massacre in which Serb forces killed up to 8,000 Muslim men and boys, gathered in their deserted town to celebrate Eid al-Adha by slaughtering sheep, goats, cows and camels to commemorate Prophet Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son Ismail on God's command.  REUTERS

Bosnian Muslims prepare a sheep for slaughter in Srebrenica on the first day of Eid al-Adha December 8, 2008. Muslim survivors of the Srebrenica massacre in which Serb forces killed up to 8,000 Muslim men and boys, gathered in their deserted town to celebrate Eid al-Adha by slaughtering sheep, goats, cows and camels to commemorate Prophet Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son Ismail on God's command. REUTERS

A family of Muslim pilgrims rest after casting seven stones at a pillar symbolizing Satan in Mena December 8, 2008. More than two million Muslim pilgrims headed to Muzdalifa on Sunday to cast stones at the devil in the most dangerous part of the haj pilgrimage. A sea of pilgrims, some on foot, some in vehicles, moved from the plain of Arafat down a desert boulevard lit by towering floodlights. At Muzdalifa, just outside Mecca, they gathered small pebbles to throw at large walls at the Jamarat Bridge, symbolising the rejection of temptation.    REUTERS

A family of Muslim pilgrims rest after casting seven stones at a pillar symbolizing Satan in Mena December 8, 2008. More than two million Muslim pilgrims headed to Muzdalifa on Sunday to cast stones at the devil in the most dangerous part of the haj pilgrimage. A sea of pilgrims, some on foot, some in vehicles, moved from the plain of Arafat down a desert boulevard lit by towering floodlights. At Muzdalifa, just outside Mecca, they gathered small pebbles to throw at large walls at the Jamarat Bridge, symbolising the rejection of temptation. REUTERS

Iraqi Muslim Sunni men take part in the early morning prayers marking the start of Eid al-Adha in the northern city of Kirkuk, 255 kms from the capital Baghdad on December 08, 2008. The Eid marks the end of the Muslim pilgrimage or Hajj in the holy city of Mecca in Saudi Arabia. AFP PHOT

Iraqi Muslim Sunni men take part in the early morning prayers marking the start of Eid al-Adha in the northern city of Kirkuk, 255 kms from the capital Baghdad on December 08, 2008. The Eid marks the end of the Muslim pilgrimage or Hajj in the holy city of Mecca in Saudi Arabia. AFP PHOT

Sambutan Eidul Adha Di Seluruh Dunia


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