Posted by: pinkturtle2 | Februari 1, 2011

23:35pm Hampir suku juta sudah berada di medan Tahrir,bilangan kian bertambah

Gambar-Gambar Terkini.. 5:35pm waktu Kaherah

Egyptians rally at Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo February 1, 2011. Hundreds of thousands of Egyptians, from students and doctors to the jobless poor, swamped Cairo on Tuesday in the biggest demonstration so far in an uprising against an increasingly isolated President Hosni Mubarak.

Egyptians rally at Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo February 1, 2011. Hundreds of thousands of Egyptians, from students and doctors to the jobless poor, swamped Cairo on Tuesday in the biggest demonstration so far in an uprising against an increasingly isolated President Hosni Mubarak.

A man looks on as protesters take part in an anti-Mubarak protest at Tahrir Square in Cairo February 1, 2011. At least one million Egyptians took to the streets on Tuesday in scenes never before seen in the Arab nation's modern history, roaring in unison for President Hosni Mubarak and his new government to quit.

A man looks on as protesters take part in an anti-Mubarak protest at Tahrir Square in Cairo February 1, 2011. At least one million Egyptians took to the streets on Tuesday in scenes never before seen in the Arab nation's modern history, roaring in unison for President Hosni Mubarak and his new government to quit.

A man looks on as protesters take part in an anti-Mubarak protest at Tahrir Square in Cairo February 1, 2011. At least one million Egyptians took to the streets on Tuesday in scenes never before seen in the Arab nation’s modern history, roaring in unison for President Hosni Mubarak and his new government to quit.

Protesters take part in an anti-Mubarak protest at Tahrir square in Cairo February 1, 2011. At least one million Egyptians took to the streets on Tuesday in scenes never before seen in the Arab nation's modern history, roaring in unison for President Hosni Mubarak and his new government to quit.

Protesters take part in an anti-Mubarak protest at Tahrir square in Cairo February 1, 2011. At least one million Egyptians took to the streets on Tuesday in scenes never before seen in the Arab nation's modern history, roaring in unison for President Hosni Mubarak and his new government to quit.

Protesters take part in an anti-Mubarak protest at Tahrir square in Cairo February 1, 2011. At least one million Egyptians took to the streets on Tuesday in scenes never before seen in the Arab nation's modern history, roaring in unison for President Hosni Mubarak and his new government to quit.

Egyptians rally at Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo February 1, 2011. Hundreds of thousands of Egyptians, from students and doctors to the jobless poor, swamped Cairo on Tuesday in the biggest demonstration so far in an uprising against an increasingly isolated President Hosni Mubarak.

Egyptians rally at Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo February 1, 2011. Hundreds of thousands of Egyptians, from students and doctors to the jobless poor, swamped Cairo on Tuesday in the biggest demonstration so far in an uprising against an increasingly isolated President Hosni Mubarak.

Thousands of demonstrators gather near a huge banner reading 'leave' in Arabic on February 1, 2011 at Cairos Tahrir Square as massive tides of protesters flooded Cairo for the biggest outpouring of anger yet in their relentless drive to oust President Hosni Mubarak's regime.

Thousands of demonstrators gather near a huge banner reading ‘leave’ in Arabic on February 1, 2011 at Cairos Tahrir Square as massive tides of protesters flooded Cairo for the biggest outpouring of anger yet in their relentless drive to oust President Hosni Mubarak’s regime.

CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 01:  A man holds an Egyptian flag during a massive rally in Tahrir Square February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protests continued with the largest rally yet, with many tens of thousands of people demanding the ouster of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarek.

CAIRO, EGYPT – FEBRUARY 01: A man holds an Egyptian flag during a massive rally in Tahrir Square February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protests continued with the largest rally yet, with many tens of thousands of people demanding the ouster of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarek.

An Egyptian army soldier gestures in front of the crowd gathering in Tahrir or Liberation Square in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2011. More than a quarter-million people flooded into the heart of Cairo Tuesday, filling the city's main square in by far the largest demonstration in a week of unceasing demands for President Hosni Mubarak to leave after nearly 30 years in power.

An Egyptian army soldier gestures in front of the crowd gathering in Tahrir or Liberation Square in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2011. More than a quarter-million people flooded into the heart of Cairo Tuesday, filling the city’s main square in by far the largest demonstration in a week of unceasing demands for President Hosni Mubarak to leave after nearly 30 years in power.

Clerics (front) and Egyptians gather in Cairo's Tahrir Square heeding a call by the opposition for a 'march of a million' to mark a week of protests calling for the ouster of Hosni Mubarak's long term regime, on February 1, 2011.

Clerics (front) and Egyptians gather in Cairo’s Tahrir Square heeding a call by the opposition for a ‘march of a million’ to mark a week of protests calling for the ouster of Hosni Mubarak’s long term regime, on February 1, 2011.

Demonstrators hold up banners in Tahrir, or Liberation, Square in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2011. More than a quarter-million people flooded into the heart of Cairo Tuesday, filling the city's main square in by far the largest demonstration in a week of unceasing demands for President Hosni Mubarak to leave after nearly 30 years in power.

Demonstrators hold up banners in Tahrir, or Liberation, Square in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2011. More than a quarter-million people flooded into the heart of Cairo Tuesday, filling the city’s main square in by far the largest demonstration in a week of unceasing demands for President Hosni Mubarak to leave after nearly 30 years in power.

Thousands of demonstrators gather on February 1, 2011 at Cairos Tahrir Square as massive tides of protesters flooded Cairo for the biggest outpouring of anger yet in their relentless drive to oust President Hosni Mubarak's regime.

An Egyptian protester holds up a sign which reads in Arabic: 'This is my shroud for the sake of Egypt' during a demonstration in Tahrir Square, in the capital Cairo, on January 31, 2011, calling for an end to President Hosni Mubarak's regime.

Protesters pray in front of Army tanks during a mass demonstration against the government in Tahrir Square in Cairo February 1, 2011. Hundreds of thousands of Egyptians, from students and doctors to the jobless poor, swamped Cairo on Tuesday in the biggest demonstration so far in an uprising against an increasingly isolated President Hosni Mubarak.

Protesters pray in front of Army tanks during a mass demonstration against the government in Tahrir Square in Cairo February 1, 2011. Hundreds of thousands of Egyptians, from students and doctors to the jobless poor, swamped Cairo on Tuesday in the biggest demonstration so far in an uprising against an increasingly isolated President HosniMubarak.

Jubilant crowds flood Cairo, escalating protests

CAIRO – More than a quarter-million people flooded Cairo’s main square Tuesday in a stunning and jubilant array of young and old, urban poor and middle class professionals, mounting by far the largest protest yet in a week of unrelenting demands for President Hosni Mubarak to leave after nearly 30 years in power.

The crowds — determined but peaceful — filled Tahrir, or Liberation, Square and spilled into nearby streets, among them people defying a government transportation shutdown to make their way from rural provinces in the Nile Delta. Protesters jammed in shoulder-to-shoulder, with schoolteachers, farmers, unemployed university graduates, women in conservative headscarves and women in high heels, men in suits and working-class men in scuffed shoes.

They sang nationalist songs, danced, beat drums and chanted the anti-Mubarak slogan “Leave! Leave! Leave!” as military helicopters buzzed overhead. Organizers said the aim was to intensify marches to get the president out of power by Friday, and similar demonstrations erupted in at least five other cities around Egypt.

Soldiers at checkpoints set up the entrances of the square did nothing to stop the crowds from entering.

The military promised on state TV Monday night that it would not fire on protesters answering a call for a million to demonstrate, a sign that army support for Mubarak may be unraveling as momentum builds for an extraordinary eruption of discontent and demands for democracy in the United States’ most important Arab ally.

“This is the end for him. It’s time,” said Musab Galal, a 23-year-old unemployed university graduate who came by minibus with his friends from the Nile Delta city of Menoufiya.

Mubarak, 82, would be the second Arab leader pushed from office by a popular uprising in the history of the modern Middle East, following the ouster last month of Tunisia’s president.

The movement to drive Mubarak out has been built on the work of on-line activists and fueled by deep frustration with an autocratic regime blamed for ignoring the needs of the poor and allowing corruption and official abuse to run rampant. After years of tight state control, protesters emboldened by the Tunisia unrest took to the streets on Jan. 25 and mounted a once-unimaginable series of protests across this nation of 80 million people — the region’s most populous country and the center of Arabic-language film-making, music and literature.AP

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More than 200,000 in Cairo demand Mubarak quit

CAIRO (Reuters) – Hundreds of thousands of Egyptians, from students and doctors to the jobless poor, swamped Cairo on Tuesday in the biggest demonstration so far in an uprising against an increasingly isolated President Hosni Mubarak.

Waving Egyptian flags and banners saying “Bye-Bye Mubarak,” the protesters rejected promises of reform to his authoritarian rule and demanded that he quit.

Huge rallies also took place in the cities of Alexandria and Suez, where protesters chanted: “Leave, leave. Revolution, revolution everywhere.”

Opposition figurehead Mohamed ElBaradei said Mubarak, 82, must leave the country before the reformist opposition would start talks with the government on the future of the Arab world’s most populous nation.

“There can be dialogue but it has to come after the demands of the people are met and the first of those is that President Mubarak leaves,” he told Al Arabiya television.

Mubarak’s grip looked increasingly tenuous after the army pledged on Monday night not to confront protesters, effectively handing over the streets to them after they pledged to bring out one million people nationwide.

The uprising of a population fed up with corruption, oppression and economic hardship broke out eight days ago and quickly spiraled to a crisis unprecedented during 30 years of rule enforced by ruthless security forces.

The disintegration of Mubarak’s power structure would usher in a new era in modern Egyptian history and reconfigure the geopolitical map of the Middle East, with huge ramifications for Washington and allies from Israel to oil giant Saudi Arabia.

The army, a powerful and respected force in Egypt, dealt a possibly fatal blow to Mubarak on Monday night when it said troops would not open fire on protesters and that they had legitimate grievances and a right to peaceful protest.

Soldiers in Tahrir (Liberation) Square, that has become a rallying point for the protests, erected barbed wire barricades but made no attempt to interfere with people. Tanks daubed with anti-Mubarak graffiti stood by.

Barbed wire barricades also ringed the presidential palace, where Mubarak is believed to be hunkered down.

“We have done the difficult part. We have taken over the street,” said protester Walid Abdel-Muttaleb, 38. “Now it’s up to the intellectuals and politicians to come together and provide us with alternatives.”

Effigies of Mubarak were hung from traffic lights and some protesters carried a mock coffin.

The crowd included lawyers and other professionals as well as workers and students, showing the breadth of opposition to Mubarak. Women and men stood together holding hands.

The demonstration was an emphatic rejection of Mubarak’s appointment of a new vice president, Omar Suleiman, cabinet reshuffle and offer to open a dialogue with the opposition.

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Pelajar Malaysia di Mesir dibawa keluar menerusi laut dan udara

01/02/2011 11:35pm

KUALA LUMPUR 1 Feb. – Perdana Menteri Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak malam ini berkata, kerajaan memutuskan untuk membawa keluar pelajar-pelajar Malaysia dari Mesir menerusi laut dan udara berikutan pergolakan di negara itu bertambah meruncing. – Bernama


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  1. […] 23:35pm Hampir suku juta sudah berada di medan Tahrir,bilangan … […]


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