Posted by: pinkturtle2 | Februari 3, 2011

Diktator Mubarak sebenarnya yang menaja keganasan(pergaduhan) di Tahrir square

A pro-government and supporter of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak throws a molotov cocktail during clashes with anti-government demonstrators in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo February 2, 2011. Opponents and supporters of Mubarak fought in central Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by the strongman to stamp out nine days of protests calling for him to quit.

Reuters Pictures 11 minutes ago

A pro-government and supporter of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak throws a molotov cocktail during clashes with anti-government demonstrators in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo February 2, 2011. Opponents and supporters of Mubarak fought in central Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by the strongman to stamp out nine days of protests calling for him to quit

Pro-government supporters of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak (L) clash with anti-government protesters in Tahrir square in central Cairo February 2, 2011. Egypt's army denied firing any shots in Cairo's Tahrir Square, where pro- and anti-government protesters were clashing, state television said on Wednesday.

Reuters Pictures 39 minutes ago

Pro-government supporters of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak (L) clash with anti-government protesters in Tahrir square in central Cairo February 2, 2011. Egypt’s army denied firing any shots in Cairo’s Tahrir Square, where pro- and anti-government protesters were clashing, state television said on Wednesday.

Pro-government and supporters of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak (top) and anti-government demonstrators (bottom) clash in Tahrir Square in Cairo February 2, 2011. Opponents and supporters of Mubarak fought in central Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by the strongman to stamp out nine days of protests calling for him to quit.

Pro and anti-Mubarak supporters clash at Tahrir Square in Cairo February 2, 2011. Opponents and supporters of Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak fought with fists, stones and clubs in Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by forces loyal to the Egyptian leader to end protests calling for him to quit.

Reuters Pictures 27 minutes ago

Pro and anti-Mubarak supporters clash at Tahrir Square in Cairo February 2, 2011. Opponents and supporters of Egypt’s President Hosni Mubarak fought with fists, stones and clubs in Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by forces loyal to the Egyptian leader to end protests calling for him to quit.

Pro-Mubarak protesters captured by anti-government supporters are handed over to the army during rioting between pro and anti-Mubarak supporters at Tahrir Square in Cairo February 2, 2011. Opponents and supporters of Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak fought with fists, stones and clubs in Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by forces loyal to the Egyptian leader to end protests calling for him to quit.

Reuters Pictures 39 minutes ago

Pro-Mubarak protesters captured by anti-government supporters are handed over to the army during rioting between pro and anti-Mubarak supporters at Tahrir Square in Cairo February 2, 2011. Opponents and supporters of Egypt’s President Hosni Mubarak fought with fists, stones and clubs in Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by forces loyal to the Egyptian leader to end protests calling for him to quit.

Anti-government supporters throw stones over a barricade at pro-Mubarak supporters during clashes at Tahrir Square in Cairo February 2, 2011. Opponents and supporters of Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak fought with fists, stones and clubs in Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by forces loyal to the Egyptian leader to end protests calling for him to quit.

Reuters Pictures 20 minutes ago

Anti-government supporters throw stones over a barricade at pro-Mubarak supporters during clashes at Tahrir Square in Cairo February 2, 2011. Opponents and supporters of Egypt’s President Hosni Mubarak fought with fists, stones and clubs in Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by forces loyal to the Egyptian leader to end protests calling for him to quit.

An injured demonstrator has blood wiped off his face during clashes between pro and anti-Mubarak supporters clash at Tahrir Square in Cairo February 2 , 2011. Opponents and supporters of Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak fought with fists, stones and clubs in Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by forces loyal to the Egyptian leader to end protests calling for him to quit.

Reuters Pictures 30 minutes ago

An injured demonstrator has blood wiped off his face during clashes between pro and anti-Mubarak supporters clash at Tahrir Square in Cairo February 2 , 2011. Opponents and supporters of Egypt’s President Hosni Mubarak fought with fists, stones and clubs in Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by forces loyal to the Egyptian leader to end protests calling for him to quit.

Pro and anti-Mubarak supporters clash at Tahrir Square in Cairo February 2, 2011. Opponents and supporters of Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak fought with fists, stones and clubs in Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by forces loyal to the Egyptian leader to end protests calling for him to quit.

An injured demonstrator holds his head during clashes between pro and anti-Mubarak supporters at Tahrir Square in Cairo February 2, 2011. Opponents and supporters of Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak fought with fists, stones and clubs in Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by forces loyal to the Egyptian leader to end protests calling for him to quit.

An army soldier on the roof of Egypt's national museum watches as pro-government supporters of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak (L) clash with anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square in central Cairo February 2, 2011. Egypt's army denied firing any shots at protesters in Cairo's Tahrir Square, where pro- and anti-government protesters clashed, state media and the Defence Ministry said.

Reuters Pictures 38 minutes ago

An army soldier on the roof of Egypt’s national museum watches as pro-government supporters of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak (L) clash with anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square in central Cairo February 2, 2011. Egypt’s army denied firing any shots at protesters in Cairo’s Tahrir Square, where pro- and anti-government protesters clashed, state media and the Defence Ministry said.

An army soldier on the roof of Egypt's national museum watches as pro-government supporters of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak (L) clash with anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square in central Cairo February 2, 2011. Egypt's army denied firing any shots at protesters in Cairo's Tahrir Square, where pro- and anti-government protesters clashed, state media and the Defence Ministry said.

Pro-government supporters of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak clash with anti-government protesters in Tahrir square in central Cairo February 2, 2011. Egypt's army denied firing any shots in Cairo's Tahrir Square, where pro- and anti-government protesters were clashing, state television said on Wednesday.

Anti-government demonstrators carry an injured man during clashes with supporters of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak at Tahrir Square in Cairo February 2, 2011. Opponents and supporters of Mubarak fought with fists, stones and clubs in Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by forces loyal to the Egyptian leader to end protests calling for him to quit.

A pro-Mubarak supporter is held by anti-Mubarak demonstrators during clashes at Tahrir Square in Cairo February 2, 2011. Opponents and supporters of Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak fought with fists, stones and clubs in Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by forces loyal to the Egyptian leader to end protests calling for him to quit.

Pro-government and supporters of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak (top) and anti-government demonstrators (bottom) clash at Tahrir Square in Cairo February 2, 2011. Opponents and supporters of Mubarak fought in central Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by the strongman to stamp out nine days of protests calling for him to quit.

Reuters Pictures 5 minutes ago

Pro-government and supporters of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak (top) and anti-government demonstrators (bottom) clash at Tahrir Square in Cairo February 2, 2011. Opponents and supporters of Mubarak fought in central Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by the strongman to stamp out nine days of protests calling for him to quit.

An injured anti-government protester is helped during clashes between pro and anti-Mubarak supporters clash at Tahrir Square in Cairo February 2, 2011. Opponents and supporters of Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak fought with fists, stones and clubs in Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by forces loyal to the Egyptian leader to end protests calling for him to quit.

Supporters of embattled Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak (top) clash with opposition protestors in Cairo's Tahrir square on February 02, 2011.

Pro-government demonstrators clash with anti-government protestors in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Feb.2, 2011. Several thousand supporters of President Hosni Mubarak, including some riding horses and camels and wielding whips, clashed with anti-government protesters Wednesday as Egypt's upheaval took a dangerous new turn.

Demonstrators run away during clashes between pro-government supporters and anti-government protestors in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Feb.2, 2011. Several thousand supporters of President Hosni Mubarak, including some riding horses and camels and wielding whips, clashed with anti-government protesters Wednesday as Egypt's upheaval took a dangerous new turn.

Pro-government demonstrators clash with anti-government protestors in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Feb.2, 2011. Several thousand supporters of President Hosni Mubarak, including some riding horses and camels and wielding whips, clashed with anti-government protesters Wednesday as Egypt's upheaval took a dangerous new turn.

Anti-government demonstrators break bricks off the floor to use during clashes with supporters of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak at Tahrir Square in Cairo February 2, 2011. Opponents and supporters of Mubarak fought with fists, stones and clubs in Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by forces loyal to the Egyptian leader to end protests calling for him to quit.

Reuters Pictures 14 minutes ago

Anti-government demonstrators break bricks off the floor to use during clashes with supporters of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak at Tahrir Square in Cairo February 2, 2011. Opponents and supporters of Mubarak fought with fists, stones and clubs in Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by forces loyal to the Egyptian leader to end protests calling for him to quit.

Anti-government demonstrators break bricks off the floor to use during clashes with supporters of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak at Tahrir Square in Cairo February 2, 2011. Opponents and supporters of Mubarak fought with fists, stones and clubs in Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by forces loyal to the Egyptian leader to end protests calling for him to quit.

An anti-government protester carries rocks during clashes in Tahrir, or Liberation square, in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Feb. 2, 2011. Several thousand supporters of President Hosni Mubarak, including some riding horses and camels and wielding whips, clashed with anti-government protesters Wednesday as Egypt's upheaval took a dangerous new turn.

AP Photo 18 minutes ago

An anti-government protester carries rocks during clashes in Tahrir, or Liberation square, in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Feb. 2, 2011.

An Egyptian  cries in front of on army tank in Tahrir, or Liberation square, in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Feb. 2, 2011. Several thousand supporters of President Hosni Mubarak, including some riding horses and camels and wielding whips, clashed with anti-government protesters Wednesday as Egypt's upheaval took a dangerous new turn.

AP Photo 13 minutes ago

An Egyptian cries in front of on army tank in Tahrir, or Liberation square, in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Feb. 2, 2011. Several thousand supporters of President Hosni Mubarak, including some riding horses and camels and wielding whips, clashed with anti-government protesters Wednesday as Egypt’s upheaval took a dangerous new turn.

Egyptian protestors take part in a demonstration on February 1, 2011 at Cairos Tahrir Square as massive tides of protesters flooded Cairo for the biggest outpouring of anger yet in their relentless drive to oust President Hosni Mubarak's regime.

Dah masuk waktu malam, sembahyang Magrib dahulu.. protes akan tetap diteruskan…

Getty Images 20 minutes ago

Egyptian protestors take part in a demonstration on February 1, 2011 at Cairos Tahrir Square as massive tides of protesters flooded Cairo for the biggest outpouring of anger yet in their relentless drive to oust President Hosni Mubarak’s regime.

Protesters, Mubarak supporters fight in Cairo square (Reuters)

By Shaimaa Fayed and Yasmine Saleh Shaimaa Fayed And Yasmine Saleh 29 mins ago

CAIRO (Reuters) – Opponents and supporters of President Hosni Mubarak fought with fists, stones and clubs in Cairo on Wednesday as the Egyptian government rejected international calls for the leader to end his 30-year-rule now.

Anti-Mubarak protesters said some of the attackers were members of the hated police force in plain clothes. In chaotic scenes in central Tahrir Square, some rode into the crowd on horses and camels and in carriages, wielding whips and sticks.

Opposition figurehead Mohamed ElBaradei, a Nobel Peace laureate, called on the army intervene to stop the violence, the worst in the nine-day uprising against Mubarak since protesters fought street battles last Friday. But troops stood by and watched.

The emergence of Mubarak loyalists, whether ordinary citizens or police, thrust a new dynamic into the momentous events in this Arab nation of 80 million people.

The protests broke out last week as public frustration with corruption, oppression and economic hardship under Mubarak boiled over.

The crisis has alarmed the United States and other Western governments who saw Mubarak as a bulwark of stability in a volatile regional, and has raised the prospect of unrest spreading to other authoritarian Arab countries.

Mubarak went on national television on Tuesday night to say he would not stand in elections scheduled for September but this was not good enough for the protesters, who demanded he leave the country immediately.

President Barack Obama telephoned the 82-year-old to say Washington wanted him to move faster on political transition.

“What is clear and what I indicated tonight to President Mubarak is my belief that an orderly transition must be meaningful, it must be peaceful and it must begin now,” Obama said after speaking to him.

But Mubarak dug his heels in on Wednesday. A Foreign Ministry statement rejected U.S. and European calls for the transition to start immediately and said they “aimed to incite the internal situation in Egypt.”

International backing for Mubarak, for three decades a stalwart of the West’s Middle East policy and defense against the spread of militant Islam, crumbled as he tried to brazen out the crisis.

France, Germany and Britain also urged a speedy transition.

Some of the few words of encouragement for him have come from oil-giant Saudi Arabia, a country seen by many analysts as vulnerable to a similar outbreak of discontent.

Israel, which signed a peace treaty with Egypt in 1979, is also watching the situation in its western neighbor nervously, weighing the possibility that anti-Israeli Islamists might gain a share of power.

FIGHTING IN THE SQUARE

Troops made no attempt to intervene as opposing factions clashed in the vast Tahrir (Liberation) Square, the focus of the protests.

Reuters correspondents saw dozens injured and many people fled in panic. But some anti-Mubarak protesters said they would not leave the square until Mubarak quits.

Khalil, a man in his 60s holding a stick, blamed Mubarak supporters and undercover security men for the clashes.

“We will not leave,” he told Reuters. “Everybody stay put.”

The Interior Ministry denied police were involved.

Earlier, the armed forces had told the protesters that their demands had been heard and it was time for them to clear the streets.

An opposition coalition, which includes Islamist organization the Muslim Brotherhood, responded to the army warning by calling for more protests.

It said it would only negotiate with Vice President Omar Suleiman, a former intelligence chief appointed by Mubarak at the weekend, once Mubarak stepped down.

Mubarak’s offer to leave in September was his latest gambit in the crisis. At the weekend he reshuffled his cabinet and promised reform but it was not enough for protesters.

One million people took to the streets of Egyptian cities on Tuesday calling for him to quit.

YEMEN, JORDAN FEEL THE HEAT

Many analysts see the army as trying to ensure a transition of power that would allow it to retain much of its influence.

Hani Sabra, a Eurasia Group analyst, said Mubarak’s announcement he would not stand in the election in September marked the start a long, messy negotiation process between the government and the opposition.

“In the medium term, these negotiations will likely produce an Egypt best described as a hybrid democracy, combining a strong military with a more pluralistic electoral system,” he said.

“Mubarak’s speech was formulated to superficially display his resolve. Mubarak also declared that he would die in Egypt, a direct reference to protestors who have demanded his departure.”

The uprising was inspired in part by a popular revolt in Tunisia last month which overthrew long-ruling President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali. The mood is spreading across the region.

King Abdullah of Jordan replaced his prime minister on Tuesday after protests there.

Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh, a key U.S. ally in the fight against al Qaeda, said on Wednesday he would not seek to extend his presidency, a move that would end his three-decade rule in 2013.

Oil prices fell back from 28-month highs, but North Sea Brent crude was still more than $101 a barrel on worries that unrest in Egypt could trigger yet more political upheaval across the Middle East and North Africa.

But with Mubarak pledging to go, foreign investors have begun to show renewed interest in Egyptian bonds and stocks and the cost of insuring Egyptian debt against default fell.

……………………………………………………………………….

A pro-government and supporter of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak throws a molotov cocktail during clashes with anti-government demonstrators in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo February 2, 2011. Opponents and supporters of Mubarak fought in central Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by the strongman to stamp out nine days of protests calling for him to quit.

Reuters Pictures 11 minutes ago

A pro-government and supporter of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak throws a molotov cocktail during clashes with anti-government demonstrators in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo February 2, 2011. Opponents and supporters of Mubarak fought in central Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by the strongman to stamp out nine days of protests calling for him to quit

Pro-Mubarak rioters hurl Molotov Cocktails at opposition

About 500 people injured in recent round of clashes, says al-Arabiya; Egyptian museum goes up in flames; Gov’t supporters throw rocks at protesters from buildings, according to reports; gun shots heard at Tahrir square.

Pro-government demonstrators in Cairo threw dozens of Molotov cocktails at those protesting against Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak on Wednesday. 

Numerous explosives were hurled as the pro-regime mob attempted to push through a no-man’s land towards the anti-Mubarak protesters in Cairo’s Tahrir (Liberation) Square.

Witnesses at Tahrir Square also said they heard several shots fired into the air, and water cannons were fired by security officials to try to calm the protests, according to reports. 

Al-Jazeera also reported that the Egyptian museum was fire bombed and that the army was trying to put out the fire.
Protests reportedly also broke out in Alexandria.

Earlier, pro-Mubarak groups also took over three army vehicles and lobbed rocks and other items at anti-government protestors from surrounding buildings, amid clashes that have been raging at Tahrir Square since early Wednesday afternoon, Al-Jazeera reported.

Al-Arabiya reported that about 500 people were injured in the most recent clashes.

……………………………………………………………………………………………..

Bloodshed in Egypt: Mubarak Supporters Riding on Horses and Camels Violently Attack Protesters in Tahrir Square

Violent clashes have broken out between pro-Mubarak and anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square in Cairo.

Violent clashes broke out just before our broadcast when supporters of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak attacked anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square in Cairo. Reports are that more than 100 people have been injured. “The entire square is surrounded by thugs, and apparently there are more coming on the way,” reports Egyptian activist Nazly Hussein. “I have seen people come out injured… I saw people carried into the medical center injured.” We get live reports from Hussein and Democracy Now!’s senior producer Sharif Abdel Kouddous, who are both in Cairo.

We begin the show in Cairo, where mass protests continue following President Hosni Mubarak’s refusal to immediately step down. The Egyptian army has called for the protests to end, but thousands remain in the streets. Violent clashes have broken out between pro-Mubarak and anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square in Cairo.

We’re going to go right now to Sharif Abdel Kouddous, Democracy Now! senior producer. He’s just come from Tahrir Square. In a moment, he’ll join us in studio, but this is too important to wait for that studio satellite to begin.

Sharif, tell us what’s happening now in Tahrir Square.

Army, I just came back from Tahrir Square. I’m standing, talking to you on a building on top of Komish Al Nile, which is right on—just a few hundred yards from Tahrir Square near the Nile. I don’t know if you can hear in the background, but there are hundreds, thousands of pro-Mubarak crowds who are streaming towards Tahrir.

In Tahrir, they have actually made it into the square. The army let them in. And now they are facing off. [inaudible] pushing. There’s a lot of cursing. This is mostly coming from the pro-Mubarak forces. If you walk in the street next to them, they’re very in-your-face. It’s a much more aggressive stance than we’ve seen. And we spoke to people in Tahrir who say that they’re basically coming from three different areas. There are Central Security forces who are dressed in civilian clothes, a lot of what we call baltaguia, who are also known as thugs. There’s also reports that the oil minister, Sameh Fahmi, issued orders for employees at oil companies to show up today in Heliopolis, another district in Cairo, and to demonstrate for Mubarak. And many of them are suspected to be government employees and members of the National Democratic Party.

This is an ominous development that’s happened now. They’re trying to take back Tahrir Square. They’re facing off right now. Protesters of the pro-democracy movement have linked arms. They’re holding strong. But the numbers are not what they last night in Tahrir. Many people went home. So it remains to be seen what is going to happen. I don’t know if you can hear in the background right now. The chants are getting louder. They are streaming in. This is a big coordinated effort to come back and take Tahrir. It remains to be seen what’s going to happen.

Many of the protesters in Tahrir said, “We’re going to stay here. We’re going to spend the night. If we get beaten, we get beaten. We will not hit back. But we are not leaving.”

……………………………………………………………………………..

Pelan Perpindahan Keluar Pelajar Malaysia Di Mesir

Kedutaan Malaysia Lancar Pelan Tindakan Evakuasi Pelajar Di Mesir

03/02/2011 1:54am

KUALA LUMPUR, 3 Feb (Bernama) — Kedutaan Besar Malaysia di Kaherah telah melancarkan Pelan Tindakan Evakuasi untuk membawa keluar warga Malaysia, khususnya pelajar dari negara bergolak itu.

Berdasarkan kenyataan yang disiarkan di blog Jabatan Penuntut Malaysia Kaherah, operasi pelan bermula 2 Feb. Rakyat Malaysia akan dibawa keluar melalui penerbangan ataupun pelayaran.

Berdasarkan modus operandi pelan berkenaan, mereka yang masih berada di negara itu akan dikumpulkan di beberapa tempat sebelum penerbangan keluar dibuat dengan pesawat Tentera Udara Diraja Malaysia (TUDM).

Kesemua individu yang diselamatkan melalui penerbangan ehsan akan dikumpulkan di Jeddah.

Individu dari Kaherah akan berkumpul di Kompleks Haiyyu Ashir dan DMAK; dari Iskandariah akan berkumpul di Rumah MARA manakala mereka dari Mansourah pula akan diterbangkan ke Iskandariah sebelum dibawa ke Jeddah dan berkumpul di Hotel New Mansourah.

Para peserta dikehendaki berkumpul sebelum bertolak ke lapangan terbang pada masa yang ditetapkan iaitu di Kaherah pada 11 pagi 2 Feb; dan pada 10 pagi 3, 4 dan 5 Feb.

Peserta dari Iskandariah pula perlu berkumpul pada 9 pagi 4, 5 dan 6 Feb.

Rakyat Malaysia yang mengikuti pelayaran pula akan melalui Pelabuhan Al-Adabiyah sebelum ke Pelabuhan Jeddah dan berkumpul di Kompleks Haiyyui Ashir.

“Jeddah adalah pusat transit (penginapan di asrama Tabung Haji) untuk tempoh tidak melebihi sebulan, penginapan dan makan minum ditanggung oleh Kerajaan Malaysia,” demikian menurut kenyataan itu.

Pelayaran dari Pelabuhan Jeddah menuju ke Pelabuhan Pulau Pinang atau Pelabuhan Klang.

Kos perjalanan balik ke Mesir adalah atas tanggungan sendiri. Bagaimanapun perjalanan dari tempat penginapan ke pelabuhan atau lapangan terbang disediakan.

Setiap peserta hanya dibenarkan membawa bagasi kecil tidak melebihi tujuh kilogram, selain diingatkan supaya membawa pasport/dokumen perjalanan yang sah.

Menurut kenyataan itu lagi, operasi menyelamat itu akan terlebih dahulu ditumpukan kepada pelajar wanita, pelajar berkeluarga, pelajar yang uzur dan sakit, berada di zon risiko tinggi, pelajar tahun pertama dan pelajar sekolah rendah/sekolah menengah.

Selain itu, pelajar juga perlu mengisi borang makluman pelajar sebelum mengikuti penerbangan dan pelayaran berkenaan.

Sebarang pertanyaan boleh dikemukakan kepada para pegawai kedutaan iaitu Saharudin Hassan (+2010-5005338), Wan Ahmad Tarmizi Wan Idris (+2010-1101004), Muhammad Hazam Hajanan (+2010-8714264) dan Samsul Kahar Kamarudin (+2010-5382715).

— BERNAMA


Responses

  1. Salam,

    Mana pon kita pi kalau mai tang bab
    laghu ni (nak hilang kuasa)
    patternnya serhopa saja.
    Dok pi dok mai tang tu jugak la.

    Tengok kelaku laghu ni teringat
    selepas PRU12.Nak kata laghu mana.
    Depa tiru kita ka atau kita tiru depa.
    atau pon memang dah sedia ada
    “procedure & operating instruction”.
    Dok taja kelaku iblis…DAJJAL la tu.

    Apa2 pon kita berharap sangat la
    Adik2 kita di sinun selamat.
    Kita memerlukan adik2 selamat
    tiba ke tanah air ….boleh lah
    berkawan dgn. adik2 di sinin.
    Sekurang2nya boleh lah menyampai
    sepatah dua kata kata adik2 di sinin
    tang bab puja & puji supaya adik2
    di sinin hilang gelong & krosot.
    Plan2 kayuh balik mai.

    • YOU CAN FOOL THE PEOPLE SOMETIME
      BUT YOU CAN’T FOOL THE PEOPLE ALL THE TIME.
      ……………….Bob Marley

  2. Ni namanya BUKU BERTEMU RUAS…

    Pertempuran sama adil,
    takdak FRU sembuq ayaq asid,
    takdak SB menyamaq “kunun-kunun” penyokong reformasi,
    takdak polis datang dengan angkuh dan sombong….

    Semuanya sama rata, sama rasa.

    Hah… baru geng pro-Mubarak bangsat ni tau,
    apa itu perjuangan jihad yang sebenaqnya.

    Tengok muslimat berpurdah kat gambaq tu,
    tetap bersemangat menyertai demo dengan
    mengutip batu untuk mengajaq puak yang kurang ajaq.

    Sampai waktu solat,
    berenti sat,
    tunaikan kewajipan kepada Allah dulu,
    pastu,
    sambung perang balik.

    Sama dengan zaman nabi dan para sahabat dulu,
    walau tengah sibuk berperang hinggakan ada yang syahid,
    solat fardhu tetap tidak ditinggaikan.

    SUARA RAKYAT….. SUARA KERAMAT….!!!!

    TERUSKAN PERJUANGAN SAUDARA-SAUDARAKU DI MESIR…!!!

    ALLAHU AKBAR…!!!!

    Kami akan terus mendoakan anda…!!!!

  3. […] Diktator Mubarak sebenarnya yang menaja keganasan(pergaduhan) di … […]

  4. […] Diktator Mubarak sebenarnya yang menaja keganasan(pergaduhan) di … […]

  5. […] Diktator Mubarak sebenarnya yang menaja keganasan(pergaduhan) di … […]

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