Posted by: pinkturtle2 | Februari 11, 2011

Kaherah 9:30pm.. ‘Army stages coup d’état in Egypt’

An Egyptian soldier is mobbed by celebrating anti-government protesters inside Tahrir Square in Cairo February 10, 2011. Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak is on the verge of capitulating to protester demands to give up power but may still seek to hold on in a nominal capacity by giving presidential powers to his deputy or a joint leadership involving an army council.

Reuters Pictures 31 minutes ago

An Egyptian soldier is mobbed by celebrating anti-government protesters inside Tahrir Square in Cairo February 10, 2011. Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak is on the verge of capitulating to protester demands to give up power but may still seek to hold on in a nominal capacity by giving presidential powers to his deputy or a joint leadership involving an army council.

An Egyptian army member is greeted by demonstrators in Tahrir square in Cairo as he said the army will announce that it will respond to demonstrator's demands, February 10, 2011. Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak is on the verge of capitulating to protester demands to give up power but may still seek to hold on in a nominal capacity by giving presidential powers to his deputy or a joint leadership involving an army council.

Reuters Pictures 41 minutes ago

An Egyptian army member is greeted by demonstrators in Tahrir square in Cairo as he said the army will announce that it will respond to demonstrator’s demands, February 10, 2011. Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak is on the verge of capitulating to protester demands to give up power but may still seek to hold on in a nominal capacity by giving presidential powers to his deputy or a joint leadership involving an army council.

A tearful opposition supporter holds an Egyptian army officer after commander Hassan al-Roweny addressed protesters in the opposition stronghold of Tahrir Square, in Cairo February 10, 2011. Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak is on the verge of capitulating to protester demands to give up power but may still seek to hold on in a nominal capacity by giving presidential powers to his deputy or a joint leadership involving an army council.

Reuters Pictures 57 minutes ago

A tearful opposition supporter holds an Egyptian army officer after commander Hassan al-Roweny addressed protesters in the opposition stronghold of Tahrir Square, in Cairo February 10, 2011. Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak is on the verge of capitulating to protester demands to give up power but may still seek to hold on in a nominal capacity by giving presidential powers to his deputy or a joint leadership involving an army council.

Egyptian protesters celebrate in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Egypt's military announced on national television Thursday it had stepped in to secure the country and promised protesters calling for President Hosni Mubarak's ouster that all their demands would soon be met.

AP Photo 43 minutes ago

Egyptian protesters celebrate in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Egypt’s military announced on national television Thursday it had stepped in to secure the country and promised protesters calling for President Hosni Mubarak’s ouster that all their demands would soon be met.

Anti-government protesters celebrate in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Egypt's military announced on national television it had stepped in to secure the country and promised protesters calling for President Hosni Mubarak's ouster that all their demands would soon be met. Tens of thousands of protesters packed in central Tahrir broke into chants of "We're almost there, we're almost there" and waved V-for-victory signs as thousands more flowed in to join them well after nightfall.

AP Photo 23 minutes ago

Anti-government protesters celebrate in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Egypt’s military announced on national television it had stepped in to secure the country and promised protesters calling for President Hosni Mubarak’s ouster that all their demands would soon be met. Tens of thousands of protesters packed in central Tahrir broke into chants of “We’re almost there, we’re almost there” and waved V-for-victory signs as thousands more flowed in to join them well after nightfall.

Anti-government protesters celebrate in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Egypt's military announced on national television it had stepped in to secure the country and promised protesters calling for President Hosni Mubarak's ouster that all their demands would soon be met. Tens of thousands of protesters packed in central Tahrir broke into chants of "We're almost there, we're almost there" and waved V-for-victory signs as thousands more flowed in to join them well after nightfall.

AP Photo 43 minutes ago

Anti-government protesters celebrate in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Egypt’s military announced on national television it had stepped in to secure the country and promised protesters calling for President Hosni Mubarak’s ouster that all their demands would soon be met. Tens of thousands of protesters packed in central Tahrir broke into chants of “We’re almost there, we’re almost there” and waved V-for-victory signs as thousands more flowed in to join them well after nightfall.

Anti-government protesters celebrate in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Egypt's military announced on national television it had stepped in to secure the country and promised protesters calling for President Hosni Mubarak's ouster that all their demands would soon be met. Tens of thousands of protesters packed in central Tahrir broke into chants of 'We're almost there, we're almost there' and waved V-for-victory signs as thousands more flowed in to join them well after nightfall.

AP Photo 33 minutes ago

Anti-government protesters celebrate in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Egypt’s military announced on national television it had stepped in to secure the country and promised protesters calling for President Hosni Mubarak’s ouster that all their demands would soon be met. Tens of thousands of protesters packed in central Tahrir broke into chants of ‘We’re almost there, we’re almost there’ and waved V-for-victory signs as thousands more flowed in to join them well after nightfall.

CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 10: People enter Tahrir Square as news of the possible resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak seeped out February 10, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. There are reports that Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak will make a statement and the possibility he will step down.

Getty Images 37 minutes ago

CAIRO, EGYPT – FEBRUARY 10: People enter Tahrir Square as news of the possible resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak seeped out February 10, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. There are reports that Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak will make a statement and the possibility he will step down.

‘Army stages coup d’état in Egypt’

The Egyptian opposition Muslim Brotherhood says the country’s army has staged a military coup amid reports of President Hosni Mubarak’s step-down from power.
A senior member of the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt’s biggest opposition group, said he feared that the Egyptian military was staging a coup.

“It looks like a military coup … I feel worry and anxiety,” Essam al-Erian told Reuters.

“The problem is not with the president, it is with the regime.”

His remarks come as Muslim Brotherhood cited presidential sources as saying that Mubarak has left Egypt.

The developments come on the 17th day of protests against Mubarak’s 30-year rule.

Meanwhile, Egyptian armed forces and tanks have surrounded Cairo’s central Liberation Square, which has been the hub of popular protests against Mubarak’s 30-year-long grip on power.

Earlier this week, Egyptian Vice President Omar Suleiman warned of the danger of a “coup” if talks between the government and opposition parties fail.PressTV

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Mubarak dijangka berundur, pengumuman pukul 4 pagi ini

11/02/2011 3:16am

KAHERAH 11 Feb. – Presiden Hosni Mubarak akan berucap menerusi televisyen kebangsaan negara itu hari ini dan dijangka akan mengumumkan pengundurannya.

Ucapan tersebut dikatakan akan berlangsung pada pukul 10 malam waktu tempatan (4 pagi waktu Malaysia), kata jurucakap kerajaan.

“Ucapannya dijadual akan bermula pada pukul 10 malam ini (waktu tempatan),” kata Magdi Radi.

Televisyen negara itu sebelum ini menyiarkan perbincangan antara Mubarak dengan Timbalan Presiden, Omar Suleiman serta Perdana Menteri, Ahmed Shafiq di kediaman presiden di Heliopolis. – AFP

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Military Takes Control in Egypt; Crowds Cheer; Mubarak to Address Nation; MSNBC, Al Jazeera Live Feed

The protesters outlasted Egyptian President Hosi Mubarak who at long last will step down. The New York Times reports Egypt’s Army Signals Transfer of Power

The command of Egypt’s military stepped forward Thursday in an attempt to stop a three-week-old uprising, declaring on state television it would take measures “to maintain the homeland and the achievements and the aspirations of the great people of Egypt” and meet the demands of the protesters. The development appeared to herald the end of President Hosni Mubarak’s 30-year rule.

Gen. Hassan al-Roueini, military commander for the Cairo area, also appeared in Tahrir Square and told the demonstrators, “All your demands will be met today.” Some in the crowd held up their hands in V-for-victory signs, shouting “the people want the end of the regime” and “Allahu akbar,” or “God is great,” a victory cry used by secular and religious people alike.

The moves marked a decisive turn in an uprising that has brought hundreds of thousands into the streets in the most sweeping revolt in the country’s history. So far, the military has stayed largely on the sidelines, but Thursday’s statement suggested it worried that the country was sliding into chaos. The military called the communiqué “the first statement of the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces,” strongly suggestive that it had arranged to take power in Egypt.

Wael Ghonim, a Google executive and protest organizer whose anti-torture Facebook page helped spark the movement, wrote on his Twitter feed Thursday evening: “Mission accomplished. Thanks to all the brave young Egyptians.”

The youthful leaders of the protest movement said that they would welcome a role for the military in running the government during a transitional period, provided it was overseen by a council composed mainly of civilians. They repeated their previous demand that the council should include only one military officer, and oversee the government for a maximum of one year until free elections under a revised constitution.

Moaz Abdel Karim, a 29 year old leader of the youth section of the Muslim Brotherhood, agreed: “We have had enough of military rule. We want a civilian president.”

Thursday’s meeting of the Supreme Council was shown on television, only the third time the council had met publicly — the first two were in 1967 and 1973, during the wars with Israel. “Today, Thursday the 10th of February of the year 2011, a meeting was held to discuss the developments of the situation today. It is decided that a meeting will convene continuously to look into what measures and procedures to be taken to maintain the homeland and the achievements and the aspirations of the great people of Egypt,” it said.

Some of the protesters say they have been inspired by Wael Ghonim, a Google executive who has emerged as a prominent voice in a revolt galvanized in part by social networking sites. On Thursday, a Twitter feed in his name in English declared: “I promise every Egyptian that I will go back to my normal life & not be involved in any politics once Egyptians fulfill their dreams.”

But, in an interview on CNN, he was also quoted as saying he was “ready to die” for the opposition’s cause. “And I’m telling this to Omar Suleiman,” he said. “He’s going to watch this. You’re not going to stop us. Kidnap me, kidnap all my colleagues. Put us in jail. Kill us. Do whatever you want to do. We are getting back our country. You guys have been ruining this country for 30 years.”


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