Posted by: pinkturtle2 | Februari 27, 2011

Tanda kejatuhan Gaddafi sudah hampir.. jutaan rakyat sudah menghampiri Tripoli

Inilah pembunuh dan pengganas no satu yang akan dihalau oleh rakyat Libya..

Saif al-Islam Kadhafi, son of Libyan leader Moamer Kadhafi, speaks during an interview with AFP in Tripoli on February 26, 2011 amid political turmoil and an insurrection against Kadhafi's crumbling regime.

Saif al-syaitan Kadhafi, son of Libyan leader Moamer Kadhafi, speaks during an interview with AFP in Tripoli on February 26, 2011 amid political turmoil and an insurrection against Kadhafi’s crumbling regime.

BENGHAZI, LIBYA - FEBRUARY 26:  A militiaman celebrates the 'liberation' of eastern Libya on February 26, 2011 at a former Libyan army base in Benghazi, Libya. Citizens continue to rally in Benghazi, demanding the removal of Libyan President Muammar Gaddafi while celebrating the defeat of Gaddafi's forces in the east. The UN who is considering sanctions against Libya over its violent attempts to put down an uprising, estimates more than 1,000 people have died in the 10-day-old revolt.

BENGHAZI, LIBYA – FEBRUARY 26: A militiaman celebrates the ‘liberation’ of eastern Libya on February 26, 2011 at a former Libyan army base in Benghazi, Libya. Citizens continue to rally in Benghazi, demanding the removal of Libyan President Muammar Gaddafi while celebrating the defeat of Gaddafi’s forces in the east. The UN who is considering sanctions against Libya over its violent attempts to put down an uprising, estimates more than 1,000 people have died in the 10-day-old revolt.

BENGHAZI, LIBYA - FEBRUARY 26:  A militiamen looks over military supplies collected from former Libyan army outposts on February 26, 2011 at a base in Benghazi, Libya. Citizens continue to rally in Benghazi, demanding the removal of Libyan President Muammar Gaddafi while celebrating the defeat of Gaddafi's forces in the east. The UN who is considering sanctions against Libya over its violent attempts to put down an uprising, estimates more than 1,000 people have died in the 10-day-old revolt.

BENGHAZI, LIBYA – FEBRUARY 26: A militiamen looks over military supplies collected from former Libyan army outposts on February 26, 2011 at a base in Benghazi, Libya. Citizens continue to rally in Benghazi, demanding the removal of Libyan President Muammar Gaddafi while celebrating the defeat of Gaddafi’s forces in the east. The UN who is considering sanctions against Libya over its violent attempts to put down an uprising, estimates more than 1,000 people have died in the 10-day-old revolt.

A man dressed as Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi takes part in a protest against Gaddafi in Benghazi February 26, 2011. Libya's rebel-held city of Benghazi has filled a political void with a coalition which is cleaning up, providing food, building defences, reassuring foreign oil firms and telling Tripoli it believes in one nation.

A man dressed as Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi takes part in a protest against Gaddafi in Benghazi February 26, 2011. Libya’s rebel-held city of Benghazi has filled a political void with a coalition which is cleaning up, providing food, building defences, reassuring foreign oil firms and telling Tripoli it believes in one nation.

BENGHAZI, LIBYA - FEBRUARY 25:  Libyans protest demanding the removal of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi following Friday prayers on February 25, 2011 in Benghazi, Libya. Benghazi residents mourned more victims of the violence as fighting continued around the capitol Tripoli.

BENGHAZI, LIBYA – FEBRUARY 25: Libyans protest demanding the removal of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi following Friday prayers on February 25, 2011 in Benghazi, Libya. Benghazi residents mourned more victims of the violence as fighting continued around the capitol Tripoli.

Libyan army paratroopers who defected and joined the popular uprising against leader Moamer Kadhafi celebrate in the eastern Libyan port city of Benghazi on February 26, 2011.

Libyan army paratroopers who defected and joined the popular uprising against leader Moamer Kadhafi celebrate in the eastern Libyan port city of Benghazi on February 26, 2011.

Libyan protesters at Tripoli’s gate

Libya is bracing for further violence as thousands of opposition protesters seeking the ouster of the Gaddafi regime move toward the capital, Tripoli.

Thousands of protesters are on their way to the capital from eastern and western cities.

Some incoming reports indicate that pro-democracy protesters have already passed through the suburbs of the city.

Meanwhile, sporadic clashes continue between protesters and government forces in the capital.

This comes as more and more soldiers are now joining the popular revolution.

The developments also come as the government is losing its grip on more cities in the country’s east and west.

Tripoli is home to two million of Libya’s more than six million population and strategically important city.

Experts say Tripoli’s fall would be a final blow to the embattled regime.

Forces loyal to Muammar Gaddafi’s government are said to be stationed outside Tripoli.

However, Gaddafi remains defiant after nearly two weeks of nationwide protests against his regime. He has even promised to open arms depots to his supporters.

The forces are exhausted for staying on standby for several days.

The aid organization Doctors Without Borders says it is concerned about the condition of the injured in the city of Benghazi.

It says the city is in short supply of medical equipment despite the heavy number of casualties.

The organization says a six-person group of its staff has arrived in the city. It says it cannot reach Tripoli by road despite the dire need for medical help there.

Over 1,000 people have already lost their lives and more fatalities are feared as Gaddafi’s regime is trying to crush the popular uprising.

The humanitarian crisis is deepening in Libya as more and more people leave the country in search of safety.PressTV

………………………………………………………………………..

PBB mengenakan hukuman terhadap Libya.. Gaddafi dan anak-anak juga akan diseret ke Mahkamah Perang Antarabangsa

UN Council slaps sanctions on Libya’s Gadhafi

UNITED NATIONS – The U.N. Security Council moved as a powerful bloc Saturday to try to halt Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi’s deadly crackdown on protesters, slapping sanctions on him, his five children and 10 top associates.

Voting 15-0 after daylong discussions interrupted with breaks to consult with capitals back home, the council imposed an arms embargo and urged U.N. member countries to freeze the assets of Gadhafi, his four sons and his daughter. The council also backed a travel ban on the Gadhafi family and 10 close associates.

Council members additionally agreed to refer the Gadhafi regime’s deadly crackdown on people protesting his rule to a permanent war crimes tribunal for an investigation of possible crimes against humanity.

The council said its actions were aimed at “deploring the gross and systematic violation of human rights, including the repression of peaceful demonstrators.” And members expressed concern about civilian deaths, “rejecting unequivocally the incitement to hostility and violence against the civilian population made from the highest level of the Libyan government.”

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon congratulated council members for the unified vote. Earlier in the day, it appeared some countries would not sign on because of concerns about the war crimes investigation.

“The text sends a strong message that gross violations of basic human rights will not be tolerated, and that those responsible for grave crimes will be held accountable,” said Ban. “I hope the message is heard, and heeded, by the regime in Libya.”

Richard Dicker, director of Human Rights Watch’s international justice program, said the council action “sends a powerful signal on behalf of justice for the people of Libya and all others victimized by mass force and violence.”

The uprising that began Feb. 15 has swept over nearly the entire eastern half of the country, breaking cities there out of his regime’s hold. Gadhafi and his backers continue to hold the capital Tripoli and have threatened to put down protests aggressively.

There have been reports that Gadhafi’s government forces have been firing indiscriminately on peaceful protesters and that as many as 1,000 people have died.

Council members did not consider imposing a no-fly zone over Libya, and no U.N.-sanctioned military action was planned. NATO also has ruled out any intervention in Libya.

The Libyan mission to the U.N., run by diplomats who have renounced Gadhafi, told the council in a letter that it supported measures “to hold to account those responsible for the armed attacks against the Libyan civilians, including through the International Criminal Court.”

The letter was signed by Ambassador Mohamed Shalgham, a former longtime Gadhafi supporter who had a dramatic change of heart after the crackdown worsened. Shalgham pleaded with the council on Friday to move quickly to halt the bloodshed in his country.

Earlier Saturday, U.S. President Barack Obama said in a telephone conversation with German Chancellor Angela Merkel that Gadhafi needs to do what’s right for his country by “leaving now.”

The White House on Friday announced sweeping new sanctions and temporarily abandoned its embassy in Tripoli as a final flight carrying American citizens left the embattled capital. The U.S. put an immediate freeze on all assets of the Libyan government held in American banks and other U.S. institutions. The sanctions also freeze assets held by Gadhafi and four of his children.

Britain and Canada, meanwhile, temporarily suspended operations at their embassies in Tripoli and evacuated their diplomatic staff.

Gadhafi is no stranger to international isolation.

U.N. sanctions were slapped on his country after suspected Libyan agents planted a bomb that blew up Pan Am Flight 103 over the Scottish town of Lockerbie in 1988, killing 270 people, mostly Americans.

Libya accepted responsibility for the bombing in 2003 and pledged to end efforts to develop weapons of mass destruction. The U.S. and Libya in 2009 exchanged ambassadors for the first time in 35 years, after Libya paid about $2.7 billion in compensation to the families of the Lockerbie victims.

In Geneva on Friday, the U.N. Human Rights Council called for an investigation into possible crimes against humanity in Libya and recommended Libya’s suspension from membership of the world body’s top human rights body.AP


Responses

  1. yahhh begitulah negara islam,,,,,orangnya gak pny hati,,,,

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